Babyproofing cabinets and drawers

Toddler pulling a kitchen drawer dangerously
Photo credit: Reshot

Your baby’s curiosity doesn’t stop. Little fingers want to touch everything, including cabinets and drawers. Cabinets and drawers can be very hazardous. They can hide dangerous objects such as sharp knives and poisonous substances. Also, they can shut on your baby’s fingers, resulting in injury. If this is not convincing enough for you to babyproof the cabinets and drawers, what about this one:  Your baby can throw the entire content of a cabinet in no time, just because he finds it fun!

Use baby safety locks and latches

There are many solutions available for preventing your child from opening cabinets and drawers. Take a look at the below options:

  • Magnet locks
  • Adhesive latches
  • Sliding locks
  • Cord locks
  • Spring release latches
4 types of cabinet locks

Do your homework

Before you splurge on a product that promises to be the best cabinet babyproof, do your homework. First check what kind of cabinets you have, and which cabinets will need proofing.

Look for this

Look for something fast to install, non-damaging, and sturdy. Read the reviews of the product; other people’s experiences might help shed some clarity.

Note that you might have to experiment with a few different types of locks before you find one that works best for you.

This is my favorite cabinet safety lock

The adhesive latches are my favorite and the most popular. Very easy to install. They generally require two anchor points to be stuck to the surface of the cabinet. They are not permanent, which means they can be easily removed when not in use. If you decide to go for this option, make sure you invest in good quality ones as some of the products available in the market either barely stick or are poorly designed.

I put a link down below to the adhesive latch I used (not affiliated). What I like most about it is that it has dual action for dual protection. So far, my son hasn’t figured out how to unlock it and I doubt he will any time soon.

Do this for a quick fix

If you don’t want to spend on babyproofing products or need a quick fix, you can use an everyday item found at your home like a good old rubber band. These work best on cabinets with knobs rather than handles. Be sure to use a thick band as the thin variety snaps too easily.

Extra tips

1 Distract your baby from forbidden places

Keep one cabinet unlocked and filled with lightweight, baby-safe items like plastic containers.

2 Don’t let your baby watch you unlocking cabinet locks

Babies are smart. They learn by imitating, and surprisingly quickly too. If your baby watches you use a cabinet lock often enough, he will eventually be able to bypass the lock on his own. If your baby is in the same room when you are about to unlock the cabinet, try to position your body between yourself and your baby to obstruct his view.

3 Don’t leave anything to chance

Even though cabinet proofing devices are highly reliable, don’t leave anything to chance. Anyone might forget putting the locks back on cabinets, including you! As a backup plan, move all dangerous items your baby could get his hands on to a higher shelf for example.

4 Cabinet locks are not a substitute for supervision

Just because you have babyproof locks does not mean you can simply stop supervising your baby. If there is one thing babies are good at it is coming up with creative ways to hurt themselves. So the best way to keep your baby safe is to be with them as they crawl and toddle around your home, especially in the kitchen and bathroom, where most accidents happen.

How did you babyproof your cabinets and drawers? Share with us your thoughts in the comments below!

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